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185
186
187


FINITE MOODS IN
SUBORDINATE CLAUSES.

185. Many subordinate clauses employ the moods and tenses with the same force that they have in principal clauses. Others, however, give to the mood or tense a force different from that which they usually have in principal clauses. Hence arises the necessity for special treatment of the moods and tenses in subordinate clauses. Principal clauses also require discussion in so far as their mood or tense affects or is affected by the subordinate clauses which limit them.

186.  Clauses considered as elements of the sentence may be classified as follows:

I.    SUBSTANTIVE.

      (1)   As subject or predicate nominative (211-214, 357-360).
      (2)   As object in indirect discourse (334-356).
      (3)   As object after verbs of exhorting, etc. (200-204).
      (4)   As object after verbs of striving, etc. (205-210).
      (5)   As object after verbs of fear and danger (224-227).

II.   ADJECTIVE.

      (1)   Appositive (211, 213).
      (2)   Relative (289-333, in part).
      (3)   Definitive (215, 216, in part).

III.  ADVERBIAL, denoting

      (1)   Time (289-3 16, in part; 321-333).
      (2)   Place (289-316, in part).
      (3)   Condition (238-277, 296-315).
      (4)   Concession (278-288).
      (5)   Cause (228-233, 294).
      (6)   Purpose ([188-196], 197-199, 317).
      (7)   Indirect object, etc. (215, 217, in part; 318, 319).
      (8)   Result (218, 219, 234-237).
      (9)   Manner (217, 289-316, in part).
      (10)  Comparison, expressing equality or inequality (289-316, in part).

REM. Conditional relative clauses introduced by relative pronouns, and relative clauses denoting cause and purpose introduced in the same way, partake at the same time of the nature of adjective and of adverbial clauses.

187.  The arrangement of the matter in the following sections (188-347) is not based upon a logical classification of clauses, such as is indicated in the preceding section, but in part on genetic relationships, and in part on considerations of practical convenience. The following is the general order of treatment:

Moods in clauses introduced by final particles
188-227
Moods in clauses of cause
228-233
Moods in clauses of result.
234-237
Moods in conditional sentences
238-277
Moods in concessive sentences
278-288
 
Moods in relative clauses
Definite relative clauses
Conditional relative clauses
Relative clauses expressing purpose
Relative clauses introduced by e[wj, etc.
289-333

292-295
296-316
317-320
321-333
 

Indirect Discourse
334-356
Construction after kai. evge,neto, etc.
357-360